Can a prescription for Xanax be called in?

It is part of a group of prescription drugs called benzodiazepines. Xanax is also a controlled drug, which means it has the potential to cause dependence or to be misused. These medications are regulated by law and it is illegal to take Xanax without a prescription from a medical doctor.

Is Xanax a sedative?

Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax and Valium, are sedatives in the form of a mild tranquilizer that work by slowing down the brain and central nervous system. They can help relax the body and reduce anxiety, but guidelines advise against extended use of the drugs, especially among the older population.

Xanax and Other Sedatives Can Be Addictive for Older Adults

Researchers say older adults can become dependent on medications for anxiety. Alternative treatments should be considered.

They can be prescribed as a temporary means of easing depression, improving sleep, and lowering anxiety.

However, new researchTrusted Source has found that prescribing benzodiazepines may cause addiction issues in 1 in 4 older adults.

Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax and Valium, are sedatives in the form of a mild tranquilizer that work by slowing down the brain and central nervous system.

They can help relax the body and reduce anxiety, but guidelines advise against extended use of the drugs, especially among the older population.

“Use of benzodiazepines by older adults have been associated with a host of potential risks including falls, fractures, motor vehicle accidents, and potentially, an increased risk of dementia. Additionally, when these types of medications are combined with other prescribed medications, such as opioids, they can increase the risk of unintentional overdoses and death,” Dr. Lauren Gerlach, a geriatric psychiatrist at the University of Michigan and lead author of the research, told Healthline.

What researchers discovered

Gerlach and her colleagues examined the use of benzodiazepines in older, low-income adults.

The researchers interviewed patients who weren’t living in nursing homes or skilled nursing facilities. They also screened them for mental health issues, as well as gathered data on their prescription history.

Out of the 576 patients studied who were given their first prescription for benzodiazepine between 2008 and 2016, 152 of those patients still had a prescription a year later.

Although guidelines state benzodiazepines should rarely be prescribed to adults over the age of 65, the average age of those receiving their first benzodiazepine prescription was 78.

Only a few of the patients had received any psychiatric or psychological care in the previous two years. All had been prescribed the medications by a nonpsychiatrist, such as a primary care physician.

“The vast majority of mental healthcare, and prescribing of psychiatric medications such as benzodiazepines to older adults, is by primary care physicians and other nonpsychiatrists. Since mental health providers see only a very small minority of older adults who have mental health issues, we need to support primary care providers better as they manage these patients’ care,” Gerlach said.

Patients who were white were four times as likely to continue with long-term use of the drugs.

The initial amount prescribed also made a difference.

“We found that nonclinical factors such as patient race and the days’ supply in the initial prescription were strongly associated with conversion to long-term use. For just every 10 additional days of medication prescribed, a patient’s risk of long-term use nearly doubled over the next year,” Gerlach said.

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Sleep can be a problem

Poor sleep was one of the factors associated with continued use of the medications.

This is despite the fact that guidelines suggest against using such drugs as long-term sleep aids.

It’s believed benzodiazepines might actually worsen rather than improve sleep with long-term use.

Dr. Grace Cheng is a geriatric pharmacist at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA).

She says that patients can become dependent on sedatives after seeing a quick improvement of their symptoms.

“Benzodiazepines can be a rapid solution for debilitating symptoms, such as the inability to fall asleep and resolution of an acute panic attack, which leads to patients’ satisfaction and perceived benefits of therapy. This may result in dependence and longer duration of use. However, they do not address the chronic management of insomnia, anxiety, and depression,” Cheng told Healthline

Cheng says there are occasions where prescribing benzodiazepines may be appropriate, but as many older adults are prescribed these drugs to deal with anxiety, insomnia, or panic disorders, there are other treatment options that should be considered.

“There are more evidence-based pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions that need to be explored prior to the use of benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines should be reserved for when other treatments are not available or effective, but just as importantly, the discussion regarding the safety of these medications should occur prior to prescribing them,” she said.

Dr. Peter Pompei is a geriatrician at Stanford University.

He says physicians should be making more of an effort to adhere to guidelines on benzodiazepines.

“Physicians want to meet their patients’ needs, and too often ignore the guidelines. More awareness of the hazards of these drugs is important for physicians caring for older persons,” he told Healthline.

Gerlach says that although the prescription of sedatives may start out well-intentioned, long-term use can be difficult to address due to patient dependence.

Both patients and providers may then be hesitant to discontinue treatment as they feel alternatives won’t be as effective.

She says physicians should have a long-term plan in mind when prescribing a benzodiazepine, paying particular attention to the amount prescribed.

“We need to help providers start with the end in mind when prescribing a benzodiazepine, by beginning with a short-duration prescription and engaging patients in discussions of when to reevaluate their symptoms and begin tapering the patient off. Since chronic benzodiazepine use is rarely the goal when a new benzodiazepine is started, clinicians may decrease the likelihood of long-term use by limiting the amount of medication they provide in that initial prescription,” Gerlach said.

As well as this, improving education for other non-pharmacological treatment, such as cognitive behavior therapy, will enable physicians to feel they can provide their patients with alternatives to sedatives.

If benzodiazepines are prescribed, Cheng says it is essential physicians continue to check in with their patients to minimize risk of long-term use.

“It is important that there is adequate communication and close follow-up with patients taking these medications. If the benzodiazepine is being prescribed for more short-term reasons, healthcare providers should include, as part of the discussion, the expected duration of therapy,” she said.

“If the benzodiazepine is being used for anxiety and panic disorder management, the role of benzodiazepines should be reserved for acute management of anxiety and panic symptoms on an as-needed basis. Healthcare providers should discuss options for the chronic management of anxiety and panic disorders during the same visit, as well as set up routine follow-up to evaluate for the efficacy, adherence, and safety of the medications,” she added.

 

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Xanax and Other Sedatives Can Be Addictive for Older Adults

Researchers say older adults can become dependent on medications for anxiety. Alternative treatments should be considered.

They can be prescribed as a temporary means of easing depression, improving sleep, and lowering anxiety.

However, new researchTrusted Source has found that prescribing benzodiazepines may cause addiction issues in 1 in 4 older adults.

Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax and Valium, are sedatives in the form of a mild tranquilizer that work by slowing down the brain and central nervous system.

They can help relax the body and reduce anxiety, but guidelines advise against extended use of the drugs, especially among the older population.

“Use of benzodiazepines by older adults have been associated with a host of potential risks including falls, fractures, motor vehicle accidents, and potentially, an increased risk of dementia. Additionally, when these types of medications are combined with other prescribed medications, such as opioids, they can increase the risk of unintentional overdoses and death,” Dr. Lauren Gerlach, a geriatric psychiatrist at the University of Michigan and lead author of the research, told Healthline.

What researchers discovered

Gerlach and her colleagues examined the use of benzodiazepines in older, low-income adults.

The researchers interviewed patients who weren’t living in nursing homes or skilled nursing facilities. They also screened them for mental health issues, as well as gathered data on their prescription history.

Out of the 576 patients studied who were given their first prescription for benzodiazepine between 2008 and 2016, 152 of those patients still had a prescription a year later.

Although guidelines state benzodiazepines should rarely be prescribed to adults over the age of 65, the average age of those receiving their first benzodiazepine prescription was 78.

Only a few of the patients had received any psychiatric or psychological care in the previous two years. All had been prescribed the medications by a nonpsychiatrist, such as a primary care physician.

“The vast majority of mental healthcare, and prescribing of psychiatric medications such as benzodiazepines to older adults, is by primary care physicians and other nonpsychiatrists. Since mental health providers see only a very small minority of older adults who have mental health issues, we need to support primary care providers better as they manage these patients’ care,” Gerlach said.

Patients who were white were four times as likely to continue with long-term use of the drugs.

The initial amount prescribed also made a difference.

“We found that nonclinical factors such as patient race and the days’ supply in the initial prescription were strongly associated with conversion to long-term use. For just every 10 additional days of medication prescribed, a patient’s risk of long-term use nearly doubled over the next year,” Gerlach said.

Is .25 of Xanax addictive?Addiction to Xanax (Alprazolam)

Xanax is a powerful benzodiazepine that is often prescribed to treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorders and insomnia. It is extremely addictive when used long-term. Xanax is the number one prescribed psychiatric medication in the United States. Seventy percent of teens with a Xanax addiction get the drug from their family’s medicine cabinet.

Tolerance to Xanax develops quickly, requiring the user to take more of the drug to achieve the desired effects. Someone with a Xanax addiction may take up to 20 to 30 pills per day. If the user decides to stop taking Xanax, they may experience withdrawal effects, such as anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, and tremors. The onset of withdrawal symptoms is a sign that a physical dependence has developed. The development of tolerance and withdrawal are indications of addiction.

Once a Xanax addiction has taken hold, daily responsibilities, such as school, work or family, are ignored as energy is redirected towards drug seeking behavior.

Other behavioral signs of Xanax addiction include:

  • Continued use of Xanax even though it is contributing to personal difficulties
  • Inability to stop using Xanax despite the desire to
  • Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
  • Obsessing about obtaining and using Xanax
  • Loss of control over the amount of Xanax being consumed
  • Legal problems that are the result of using Xanax
  • Risk-taking behaviors, such as driving while under the influence of Xanax

If a user wishes to stop taking Xanax after dependence on the drug has formed, it is not recommended to quit “cold turkey” or without medical supervision. The symptoms of Xanax withdrawal are similar to those of alcohol or barbiturate withdrawal, and the severity of the symptoms can vary. If convulsions occur, withdrawal from Xanax can be deadly.

Normally, the withdrawal process involves slowly reducing the dosage of Xanax and eventually switching the user to a long-acting form of the drug for a period of time. The gradual taper of this drug helps to reduce withdrawal symptoms.

Understanding Xanax

Xanax is the brand name for alprazolam, a prescription sedative in the benzodiazepines family. Benzodiazepines were originally developed as a replacement for barbiturates. Xanax affects the brain and central nervous system (CNS). It boosts a brain chemical called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which slows down the nerve cell activity in the brain. The result is a calm and relaxed feeling.

Because Xanax is a CNS depressant, common effects of the drug include slurred speech, loss of coordination, and anxiety.

 

Xanax is dispensed in 0.25 mg, 0.5 mg, 1 mg and 2 mg strengths. The pills come in different shapes and colors depending on strength. The 2 mg tablets are white, green, or yellow in color and rectangular in shape. The rest are oval shaped and colored white (0.25 mg), orange (0.5 mg) or blue (1 mg). Xanax is a regulated schedule IV controlled substance.

After taking Xanax, the peak effects of the drug are typically felt within one to two hours. As an intermediate-duration drug, Xanax stays in a person’s system for 12 to 15 hours.

Is Xanax bad for your liver?

Is xanax bad for your liver? Prolonged use of Xanax has the risk of potentially damaging the nerve tissue of the liver. When this happens, liver inflammation may occur. Even if you are not familiar with the different brand names of prescription drugs, you may have heard of Xanax. When used responsibly, Xanax can provide a range of benefits. Is xanax harmful to your liver? However, when misused or abused, this drug can cause some undesirable side effects. Could liver damage be one of them?

What Is Xanax?

Xanax is the brand name of Alprazolam, which is a sedative in prescription benzodiazepines. It is designed to relieve and treat anxiety and panic disorder. This is how it works:
  1. Xanax targets and enhances the chemical in your brain that’s responsible for relaxation.
  2. It depresses the central nervous system to decrease activity and ease restlessness.
Is xanax bad for your liver? Xanax is known for calming users down and providing quick relief, which is why it is commonly abused. However, Xanax can be successful for individuals with diagnosed anxiety disorders who have talked to their doctor about what they are experiencing. If you or someone you know has an anxiety or panic disorder, ask your doctor how Xanax may affect you.

The Effects of Xanax, is xanax bad for your liver?

Even though Xanax has a different impact on everyone, there are some common and potentially dangerous side effects to be aware of. Xanax, when used for a prolonged period of time, may cause or contribute to:
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Dry mouth
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Trouble with balance
  • Speech issues
  • Decreased inhibitions
  • Irritable behavior
  • Weight changes
  • Appetite changes
  • Skin rash
  • Trouble breathing
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Blurred vision
  • Yellow skin or eyes
  • Trouble breathing
  • Hallucinations
  • Mania or increased energy
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Suicidal thoughts
While there are many possibilities regarding the issues that Xanax may create in a person’s body and mind, one question still remains: can it cause liver damage?

Can Xanax Cause Liver Damage?

Is xanax bad for your liver? Using Xanax for an extended period of time comes with a risk of potentially damaging nerve tissue in the liver. When this happens, liver inflammation may occur. Is xanax bad for your liver? This depends on the condition of someone’s liver, how long they’ve used substances for, and how frequently they use them. These risks are intensified if a person combines Xanax with alcohol. Alcohol abuse is one of the leading causes of liver inflammation and damage. When someone combines alcohol with another substance, especially one that can also cause liver problems, their personal risk will only increase.

How to Protect Your Liver

Is xanax bad for your liver? The most effective way to protect your liver is to abstain from alcohol and drugs. However, it’s sometimes necessary to take specific prescription drugs. If you have a history of alcohol abuse or liver damage in your family, talk to your doctor before using any prescriptions such as Xanax. If you’re prescribed Xanax, only use according to prescription. Do not take more pills than the recommended highly dosage. For further liver relief and general wellness, try to drink plenty of water and eat a balanced diet daily.

Dangers Of Xanax Addiction

Xanax works by increasing the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. The more that Xanax is used, the less the brain regulates this chemical on its own. This causes fluctuating rates of GABA, which is why seizures may occur from either abusing Xanax or abruptly stopping Xanax use. When a person stops taking Xanax, the brain has to readjust to producing GABA naturally. This can mean a period of time in which brain activity is increased and anxiety is higher because the brain is no longer as efficient at self-regulating. This is what leads people to develop a Xanax addiction.

If you think that you or a loved one may be experiencing negative side effects from Xanax, contact our team of substance abuse and medical professionals to see if treatment or other medication options might be best for you. Visit us here or call 866-345-1543 to learn more.

Sources

https://vertavahealth.com/alprazolam/side-effects/ https://americanaddictioncenters.org/xanax-treatment/long-term-severe

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How to use alprazolam oral

How to use alprazolam oral

How to use alprazolam oral? Read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start taking alprazolam and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

how to take alprazolam for sleep

Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually once daily in the morning. Do not take with a high-fat meal because doing so can increase the risk of side effects. Do not crush or chew extended-release tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects.

Also, do not split the tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing. Dosage is based on your medical condition, age, and response to treatment. Your dose may be gradually increased until the drug starts working well. Follow your doctor’s instructions closely to reduce the risk of side effects.

How to use alprazolam oral

Though it helps many people, this medication may sometimes cause addiction. This risk may be higher if you have a substance use disorder (such as overuse of or addiction to drugs/alcohol). Take this medication exactly as prescribed to lower the risk of addiction. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more detail. When this medication is used for a long time, it may not work as well. Talk with your doctor if this medication stops working well.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

What does xanax do?

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What Does Xanax Do?

What does xanax do? According to Medical News Today, Xanax is a brand name for the drug alprazolam, which belongs to a group of drugs called benzodiazepines. Xanax is used to treat anxiety and panic disorders and is the single most prescribed psychiatric medication in the United States. Xanax works by increasing the amount of the neurotransmitter GABA in the brain to promote calmness and a relaxed feeling. This greatly helps people who suffer from anxiety disorders so that they are able to remain calmer in a particularly stressful situation, help curb panic attacks and calm their body’s overactivity. When taken as prescribed, What does xanax do? Xanax can be a safe and effective medication. However, it all too often becomes abused.

Anxiety Disorders. What does xanax do?

There are many types of anxiety disorders that Xanax can help treat. According to Healthline, the side effects of anxiety that Xanax can help treat include:
  • Excessive worry and irrational fears. This is the most common symptom of anxiety. Worrying excessively about things or fearing irrational things to the point where you cannot function normally could be a red flag for anxiety.
  • Agitation or irritability. When someone is feeling anxious, it is very easy for them to become agitated or feel irritable. They are feeling uncomfortable and on edge, because their brain thinks it has senses danger.
  • Difficulty concentrating. Anxiety can easily interrupt a memory or a train of thought. Tense muscles. One of the many physical symptoms of anxiety, tense muscles can occur when someone is about to experience a panic attack.
  • Trouble sleeping. Anxiety can often cause people such intense worry that they cannot sleep at night. When they finally find comfort in sleeping, they can sleep for many hours or become fatigued from being awake for so long.
  • Panic attacks. The most debilitating symptom of anxiety, panic attacks can cause such intense fear or worry that the person experiences rapid heartbeat, sweating, shaking, shortness of breath, chest tightness, nausea and fear of dying.
  • Isolation. People who suffer from anxiety will try their best to avoid potentially triggering situations, which could lead to extreme isolation.

Addiction to Xanax

Unfortunately, one of the major downsides of Xanax is that it is a highly addictive medication. This is why it is extremely important to take it as prescribed and if you are starting to feel dependent or addicted to the medicine, let a medical professional know as soon as possible. There are other ways to treat anxiety and it’s symptoms without having to take Xanax, so make sure you do your best to get help without fear of anxiety returning.

Signs of Addiction to Xanax

If you feel as if you or a loved one might be becoming addicted to Xanax, pay attention to these major red flags of addiction: What does xanax do?
  • Drug-seeking behavior, such as having multiple prescriptions or multiple doctors
  • Taking more Xanax than what is prescribed
  • Taking Xanax at inappropriate times of the day, such as in the morning or at work
  • Feeling like you cannot slow down or stop using
  • Drinking alcohol or taking other drugs while taking Xanax
  • Changes in eating patterns, sleeping patterns, hygiene or weight
  • Isolating from friends or family in favor of taking Xanax

Withdrawal from Xanax

What does xanax do? Xanax works by decreasing abnormal excitement in the brain that people who experience anxiety suffer from. As a Benzodiazepine, Xanax acts on the brain and central nervous system to produce a calming effect and ease anxiety symptoms. It is fast-acting, which is helpful for someone who is suddenly experiencing anxiety and needs relief quickly. However, this fast-acting euphoric effect can often become abused and addiction can occur. What does xanax do? When someone has been abusing Xanax for a period of time and suddenly stops taking it, the body can begin to suffer from withdrawal symptoms. This is because the brain and body have become chemically rewired to depend on the drug, so readjusting back to normality can be uncomfortable. Some withdrawal symptoms from Xanax can include:
  • Tremors
  • Diarrhea
  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Muscle pain
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Anxiety
  • Paranoia
  • Seizures
  • Heart palpitations
  • Sweating
  • Sensitivity to light and sound
  • Loss of appetite

Medical Detox

In an effort to comfortably stop taking Xanax and become sober, medical detox may be offered. What does xanax do? This is the process of taking advantage of medications that will help curb withdrawal symptoms and cravings while allowing the body to comfortably readjust and rewire without Xanax. This also allows the opportunity for people to begin behavioral therapy more quickly and focus on it more clearly.

About Pinelands Recovery Center

It is possible to live a life free of anxiety without needing to rely on Xanax. If you or a loved one may be suffering from an addiction to Xanax, don’t be afraid to reach out for help. Is Xanax bad for your liver? Pinelands Recovery Center of Medford is widely known as one of New Jersey’s finest, most respected addiction treatment facilities. With comfortable 30-bed accommodations and 24-hour professional staff, we can offer clients a serene, relaxing environment amid the lush piney woods. This stress-free setting with its sense of warmth and welcoming enables you to feel comfortable and confident about your clean and sober life ahead. How to use alprazolam oral We will establish clear goals, both general in nature and specific to your needs. We continue to monitor those goals, to make sure that our clients are progressing and buying into their recovery plan. We thrive on assisting clients in feeling connected to the recovery community, share and demonstrate effective coping techniques, help clients to modify attitudes and patterns of behavior and everything else you will need to be happy and productive living a sober, healthy life. We ensure that clients complete their planned concrete tasks, encourage hope, optimism and healthy living. Our recovery program is not a revolving door treatment program; it is a recovery model designed to help clients go on to lead productive, happy lives. For more information, visit wemedicals.com

WHAT ARE THE IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATION OF XANAX?

WARNING: RISKS FROM CONCOMITANT USE WITH OPIOIDS

XANAX is a benzodiazepine medicine. Taking benzodiazepines with opioid medicines, alcohol, or other central nervous system depressants (including street drugs) can cause severe drowsiness, breathing problems (respiratory depression), coma, and death.

Do not take XANAX if you are allergic to alprazolam, other benzodiazepines, or any of the ingredients in XANAX.

Do not take XANAX if you are currently taking antifungal treatments including ketoconazole or itraconazole.

XANAX is a federal controlled substance (C-IV) because it can be abused or lead to dependence. Keep XANAX in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse.

XANAX can make you sleepy or dizzy, and can slow your thinking and motor skills.

  • Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do other dangerous activities until you know how XANAX affects you.
  • Do not drink alcohol or take other drugs that may make you sleepy or dizzy while taking XANAX without first talking to your healthcare provider. When taken with alcohol or drugs that cause sleepiness or dizziness, XANAX may make your sleepiness or dizziness much worse.

Before you take XANAX, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have or have had depression, mood problems, or suicidal thoughts or behavior.
  • Have liver or kidney problems.
  • Have lung disease or breathing problems.
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. XANAX may harm your unborn baby. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you should take XANAX while you are pregnant.
  • Are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. You should not breastfeed while taking XANAX.

Before taking XANAX, tell your healthcare provider about all prescriptions, over-the-counter medicines and supplements you take. Taking XANAX with certain other medicines can cause side effects or affect how well XANAX or the other medicines work.

Do not increase the dose of XANAX, even if you think it isn’t working, without consulting your doctor. Benzodiazepines, even when used as recommended, may produce emotional and/or physical dependence.

Do not stop taking this medication abruptly or decrease the dose without consulting your doctor, since withdrawal symptoms can occur. Withdrawal symptoms can be serious and include seizures.

XANAX may cause an increase in activity and talking (hypomania and mania) in people who have depression.

The most common side effects of XANAX include drowsiness and light-headedness.

INDICATION

XANAX (alprazolam) is indicated for the management of anxiety disorders and the short-term relief of symptoms of anxiety in adults. XANAX is also indicated for the treatment of panic disorder in adults with or without a fear of places and situations that might cause panic, helplessness, or embarrassment (agoraphobia).

ANXIETY TREATMENT

XANAX is indicated for the management of anxiety disorders and the short-term relief of symptoms of anxiety in adults. XANAX is also indicated for the treatment of panic disorder in adults with or without a fear of places and situations that might cause panic, helplessness, or embarrassment (agoraphobia).

Who should not use Alprazolam?

  • Individuals who have a history of hypersensitivity reactions to the drug.
  • People with lactose intolerance.
  • People with respiratory failure, pronounced hepatic and renal impairment, myasthenia gravis, acute poisoning with alcohol, acute glaucoma, psychotropic, hypnotic or narcotic drugs.
  • When using Alprazolam, it is forbidden to be engaged in activities that require concentration and speed of psychomotor reactions.

What are the uses of Xanax (Alprazolam)?

  • Alprazolam is widely used in the treatment of neuroses with an anxiety syndrome.
  • It has a very good effect in the relief of panic attacks accompanied by cardiovascular and gastrointestinal disturbances (in conditions previously described as sympathoadrenal paroxysms, bear’s disease, etc.). A panic attack is usually stopped after 10 minutes of taking alprazolam.
  • Xanax (Alprazolam) may be prescribed to people with reactive depressive states, including those developed against a background of somatic diseases.
  • Alprazolam can be used in combination with other drugs for treating nausea and vomiting, induced by chemotherapy.
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