Buy Oxycodone

This medication is used to help relieve moderate to severe pain. Oxycodone belongs to a class of drugs known as opioid analgesics. It works in the brain to change how your body feels and responds to pain.

How to use

Read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start taking oxycodone and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor. You may take this drug with or without food. If you have nausea, it may help to take this drug with food. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about other ways to decrease nausea (such as lying down for 1 to 2 hours with as little head movement as possible).

Avoid eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while using this medication unless your doctor or pharmacist says you may do so safely. Grapefruit can increase the chance of side effects with this medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

If you are using the liquid form of this medication, carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure how to check or measure the dose.

The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Do not increase your dose, take the medication more frequently, or take it for a longer time than prescribed. Properly stop the medication when so directed.

Pain medications work best if they are used when the first signs of pain occur. If you wait until the pain has worsened, the medication may not work as well.

If you have ongoing pain (such as due to cancer), your doctor may direct you to also take long-acting opioid medications. In that case, this medication might be used for sudden (breakthrough) pain only as needed. Other pain relievers (such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen) may also be prescribed with this medication. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about using oxycodone safely with other drugs.

Suddenly stopping this medication may cause withdrawal, especially if you have used it for a long time or in high doses. To prevent withdrawal, your doctor may lower your dose slowly. Tell your doctor or pharmacist right away if you have any withdrawal symptoms such as restlessness, mental/mood changes (including anxiety, trouble sleeping, thoughts of suicide), watering eyes, runny nose, nausea, diarrhea, sweating, muscle aches, or sudden changes in behavior.

When this medication is used for a long time, it may not work as well. Talk with your doctor if this medication stops working well.

Though it helps many people, this medication may sometimes cause addiction. This risk may be higher if you have a substance use disorder (such as overuse of or addiction to drugs/alcohol). Take this medication exactly as prescribed to lower the risk of addiction. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Tell your doctor if your pain does not get better or if it gets worse.

Side effects

See also Warning section.

Nausea, vomiting, constipation, lightheadedness, dizziness, or drowsiness may occur. Some of these side effects may decrease after you have been using this medication for a while. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

To prevent constipation, eat dietary fiber, drink enough water, and exercise. You may also need to take a laxative. Ask your pharmacist which type of laxative is right for you.

To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: interrupted breathing during sleep (sleep apnea), mental/mood changes (such as agitation, confusion, hallucinations), severe stomach/abdominal pain, difficulty urinating, signs of your adrenal glands not working well (such as loss of appetite, unusual tiredness, weight loss).

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: fainting, seizure, slow/shallow breathing, severe drowsiness/difficulty waking up.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Warnings & Precautions

Before taking oxycodone, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other opioid pain relievers (such as oxymorphone); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: brain disorders (such as head injury, tumor, seizures), breathing problems (such as asthma, sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-COPD), kidney disease, liver disease, mental/mood disorders (such as confusion, depression), personal or family history of a substance use disorder (such as overuse of or addiction to drugs/alcohol), stomach/intestinal problems (such as blockage, constipation, diarrhea due to infection, paralytic ileus), difficulty urinating (such as due to enlarged prostate), gallbladder disease, disease of the pancreas (pancreatitis).

This drug may make you dizzy or drowsy. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Avoid alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Liquid products may contain sugar, aspartame, and/or alcohol. Caution is advised if you have diabetes, alcohol dependence, liver disease, phenylketonuria (PKU), or any other condition that requires you to limit/avoid these substances in your diet. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about using this product safely.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially confusion, dizziness, drowsiness, and slow/shallow breathing.

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. It may harm an unborn baby. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. (See also Warning section.) This drug passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Tell the doctor right away if your baby develops unusual sleepiness, difficulty feeding, or trouble breathing. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets. See also Warning section.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. For more details, read the Medication Guide, or consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

Drug interactions

See also Warning and How to Use sections.

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: certain pain medications (mixed opioid agonist/antagonists such as pentazocine, nalbuphine, butorphanol), naltrexone.

The risk of serious side effects (such as slow/shallow breathing, severe drowsiness/dizziness) may be increased if this medication is taken with other products that may also cause drowsiness or breathing problems. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products such as other opioid pain or cough relievers (such as codeine, hydrocodone), alcohol, marijuana (cannabis), drugs for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, lorazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants (such as carisoprodol, cyclobenzaprine), or antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine).

Check the labels on all your medicines (such as allergy or cough-and-cold products) because they may contain ingredients that cause drowsiness. Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely.

Other medications can affect the removal of oxycodone from your body, which may affect how oxycodone works. Examples include azole antifungals (such as ketoconazole), macrolide antibiotics (such as erythromycin), mifepristone, HIV medications (such as ritonavir), rifamycins (such as rifabutin, rifampin), certain drugs used to treat seizures (such as carbamazepine, phenytoin), among others.

This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including amylase/lipase levels), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, give them naloxone if available, then call 911. If the person is awake and has no symptoms, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: slow/shallow breathing, slow heartbeat, coma.

More

Missed Doses:

If you are taking this medication on a regular schedule and miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose. Take your next dose at the regular time. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Notes:

Do not share this medication with others. Sharing it is against the law.

This medication has been prescribed for your current condition only. Do not use it later for another condition unless told to do so by your doctor. A different medication may be necessary in that case.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should have naloxone available to treat opioid overdose. Teach your family or household members about the signs of an opioid overdose and how to treat it.

Oxycodone

1. About oxycodone

Oxycodone is an opiate painkiller. It’s used to treat severe pain, for example after an operation or a serious injury, or pain from cancer.

It’s also used for other types of long-standing pain when weaker painkillers, such as paracetamolibuprofen and aspirin, have not worked.

Oxycodone is only available on prescription. It comes as slow-release tablets, capsules and a liquid which you swallow. It can also be given by an injection, but this is usually done in hospital.

Oxycodone is also known by the brand names Oxynorm and OxyContin.

It’s sometimes given as a tablet which also has a medicine called naloxone in it (Targinact). This is used to prevent certain side effects, such as constipation.

2. Key facts

  • Oxycodone works by stopping pain signals travelling along the nerves to the brain.
  • Oxycodone liquid and capsules work in 30 to 60 minutes but wear off after 4 to 6 hours.
  • It’s possible to become addicted to oxycodone, but this is rare if you’re taking it to relieve pain and as your doctor has prescribed.
  • Oxycodone can cause withdrawal problems. Do not stop taking the medicine suddenly.
  • The most common side effects of oxycodone are constipation, feeling sick and sleepy.

3. Who can and cannot take oxycodone

Oxycodone can be taken by adults and children aged 1 month and older.

Babies, young children and older people are more likely to get side effects.

Oxycodone is not suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting this medicine if you:

  • have ever had an allergic reaction to oxycodone or any other medicine
  • have lung problems, asthma or breathing difficulties
  • have an addiction to alcohol
  • have a head injury or condition which causes seizures or fits
  • have an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism)
  • have kidney or liver problems
  • have an enlarged prostate
  • have low blood pressure (hypotension)
  • have a mental health condition which is affected by certain medicines
  • have had recent stomach surgery or bowel problems
  • are trying to get pregnant, are already pregnant or if you’re breastfeeding

4. How and when to take it

It’s important to take oxycodone as your doctor has asked you to.

Take oxycodone with, or just after, a meal or snack as it’s less likely to make you feel sick.

It’s important to swallow slow-release oxycodone tablets whole with a drink of water.

Important

Do not break, crush, chew or suck oxycodone slow-release tablets. If you do, the slow-release system will not work and the whole dose might get into your body in one go. This could cause an overdose.

Oxycodone comes as:

  • capsules – these contain 5mg, 10mg or 20mg of oxycodone
  • slow-release tablets – these contain 5mg, 10mg, 15mg, 20mg, 30mg, 40mg, 60mg, 80mg or 120mg of oxycodone
  • liquid – this contains 5mg of oxycodone in 5ml or 10mg of oxycodone in 1ml of liquid.

Oxycodone liquid, capsules and injections work faster (fast acting). They’re used for pain which is expected to last for a short time and often used when you start taking oxycodone, to help find the right dose.

Oxycodone tablets are slow release. This means the oxycodone is gradually released into your body over either 12 or 24 hours. This type of oxycodone takes longer to start working but lasts longer. It’s used for long-term pain.

Sometimes your doctor may prescribe both fast-acting and slow-release oxycodone to manage long-term pain.

How often will I take it?

How often you take it depends on the type of oxycodone that you’ve been prescribed:

  • capsules – usually 4 to 6 times a day
  • slow-release tablets – usually 1 to 2 times a day
  • liquid – usually 4 to 6 times a day

You can take oxycodone at any time of day, but try to take it at the same time every day and space your doses evenly. For example, if you take oxycodone twice a day and have your first dose at 8am, take your second dose at 8pm.

Will my dose go up or down?

Usually, you start on a low dose of oxycodone and this is increased gradually until your pain is well controlled. Once your pain is under control, your doctor may prescribe slow-release tablets. This may cut down the number of doses you have to take each day.

When you stop taking oxycodone your doctor will gradually reduce your dose, especially if you’ve been taking it for a long time.

What if I forget to take it?

This will depend on which type of oxycodone you’re taking.

If you forget to take a dose, check the information that comes with the medicine or ask your pharmacist or doctor for advice.

Never take 2 doses at the same time to make up for a forgotten one.

If you often forget doses, it may help to set an alarm to remind you. You could also ask a pharmacist for advice on other ways to remember to take your medicine.

What if I take too much?

If you go to A&E, do not drive yourself – get someone else to drive you or call for an ambulance.

Take the oxycodone box or leaflet inside the packet plus any remaining medicine with you.

Where to store oxycodone

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  • store it properly and safely at home
  • keep it out of the sight and reach of children
  • do not give your medicine to anyone else
  • return any unused oxycodone to a pharmacy so it can be thrown away safely
  • 5. Taking oxycodone with other painkillers

    It’s safe to take oxycodone with paracetamolibuprofen or aspirin (do not give aspirin to children under 16 years of age).

    Do not take oxycodone with painkillers that contain codeine. You will be more likely to get side effects.

    Painkillers that contain codeine include co-codamol (codeine and paracetamol), Nurofen Plus (codeine and ibuprofen) co-codaprin (codeine and aspirin) and Solpadeine (codeine, paracetamol, ibuprofen and caffeine).

    6. Side effects

    Like all medicines, oxycodone can cause side effects in some people, but many people have no side effects or only minor ones.

    The higher the dose of oxycodone the more chance that you will get side effects.

    Common side effects

    Common side effects happen in more than 1 in 100 people. Talk to a doctor or pharmacist if these side effects bother you or do not go away:

    Serious side effects

    Serious side effects happen in less than 1 in 100 people. Call a doctor if you have:

    • muscle stiffness
    • feel dizzy, tired and have low energy – this could be a sign of low blood pressure (hypotension)
    • Serious allergic reaction

      In rare cases, it’s possible to have a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to oxycodone.https://wemedicals.com/product/buy-oxycodone-30mg-online/

    • 7. How to cope with side effects

      What to do about:

      • constipation – try to include more high-fibre foods in your diet such as fruits, vegetables and cereals. Try to drink several glasses of water each day. If you can, it may also help to do some gentle exercise. Ask your doctor about medicine to help prevent or treat constipation caused by oxycodone.
      • stomach discomfort, feeling or being sick – take oxycodone with or just after a meal or snack to ease feelings of sickness. Ensure the tablets or capsules are swallowed whole with a glass of water. This side effect should usually wear off after a few days. Talk to a doctor about taking anti-sickness medicine if it carries on for longer.
      • feeling sleepy, tired or dizzy – these side effects should wear off within a week or two as your body gets used to oxycodone. Talk to a doctor if they carry on for longer.
      • confusion – talk to a doctor if you feel confused. Your dose may need to be adjusted.
      • headaches – make sure you rest and drink plenty of fluids. It may be best not to drink alcohol while taking oxycodone as this can make headaches worse. It’s safe to take an everyday painkiller such as paracetamol or ibuprofen. Talk to a doctor if headaches last longer than a week or are severe.

      itchiness or rash – it may help to take an antihistamine which you can buy from a pharmacy. Check with the pharmacist to see what type is suitable for you. If symptoms do not go away or they get worse, talk to a doctor as you may need to try a different painkiller.

      Do not take any other medicines to treat the side effects of oxycodone without speaking to a pharmacist or doctor first.

      8. Pregnancy and breastfeeding

      Oxycodone is generally not recommended during pregnancy or while breastfeeding.

      In early pregnancy, it’s been linked to some problems for your baby. If you take oxycodone at the end of pregnancy there’s a risk that your baby may get withdrawal symptoms or be addicted to oxycodone when they’re born.

      However, it’s important to treat pain in pregnancy. For some pregnant women with severe pain, oxycodone might be the right medicine. Your doctor is the best person to help you decide what’s right for you and your baby.

      Find out more about how oxycodone can affect you and your baby during pregnancy) from Best Use of Medicines in Pregnancy (BUMPS).

      Oxycodone and breastfeeding

      Oxycodone is not usually recommended if you’re breastfeeding. Small amounts of oxycodone pass into breast milk and may cause breathing problems for your baby.

      Tell a doctor if you are breastfeeding. They may be able to recommend a different painkiller.

      9. Cautions with other medicines

      Some medicines and oxycodone interfere with each other and increase the chance that you will have side effects.

      Tell a doctor before you start taking oxycodone if you are taking any medicines:

      • to help you sleep
      • for depression or mental health problems – some types cannot be taken with oxycodone
      • for high blood pressure (hypertension)
      • to help stop you feeling or being sick (vomiting), such as domperidone or metoclopramide
      • to treat symptoms of an allergy such as antihistamines
      • to reduce tension or anxiety
      • for an infection
      • to control seizures of fits due to epilepsy

      Mixing oxycodone with herbal remedies and supplements

      It’s not possible to say that oxycodone is safe to take with herbal remedies and supplements. They’re not tested for the effect they have on other medicines in the same way pharmacy and prescription medicines are.

      Important

      Tell a doctor or pharmacist if you’re taking any other medicines, including herbal remedies, vitamins or supplements.

How long does it take for oxycodone to work?

Fast-acting oxycodone (capsules and liquid) take 30 to 60 minutes to work, but these wear off after 4 to 6 hours. Slow-acting oxycodone (tablets) can take 1 to 2 days to work fully, but the pain relief will last longer.

This depends on the type of oxycodone you take – fast acting or slow acting.

Fast-acting oxycodone (capsules and liquid) take 30 to 60 minutes to work, but these wear off after 4 to 6 hours.

Slow-acting oxycodone (tablets) can take 1 to 2 days to work fully, but the pain relief will last longer.

An oxycodone injection into a vein gives the quickest pain relief and works almost straight away.

Is oxycodone the same as Percocet?

Oxycodone and Percocet are often confused for the same medication. This is understandable as both are opioid pain medications and both have been in the news a lot due to the opioid epidemic.

Percocet is a brand name for a drug that contains a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen — another pain medication more commonly known by its brand name, Tylenol.

Any drug that contains oxycodone, including Percocet, has a potential for abuse. Both oxycodone and Percocet are considered highly addictive. The key differences between them are:

  • Oxycodone is a derivative of opium and sold under different brand names, including OxyContin.
  • Percocet is a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen.
  • Oxycodone and Percocet are both classified as narcotic analgesics.
What is oxycodone and what is Percocet?

Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opiate that is made by modifying thebaine, an organic compound in opium.

Oxycodone is available in different forms. This includes:

  • immediate-release tablets and capsules (Oxaydo, Roxicodone, Roxybond), which are released into the bloodstream right away
  • extended-release tablets and capsules (OxyContin), which are released into the bloodstream gradually
  • oral solution, which is used for managing pain in people who cannot swallow tablets, and is often administered via a gastric tube

Oxycodone acts on your central nervous system (CNS) to block the feeling of pain. Percocet does this as well, but offers a second mode of pain relief from the acetaminophen, which is a non-opiate analgesic that also relieves fever.

Oxycodone  uses vs. Percocet uses

Oxycodone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form provides relief of ongoing pain, such as pain associated with cancer.

Percocet is also used to treat moderate to severe pain, but can also be prescribed for conditions associated with fever. It can also be used to treat breakthrough pain when a long-acting pain drug doesn’t provide enough relief.

Percocet is not recommended for long-term use because acetaminophen has been found to cause serious liver damage.

Dosing depends on your need and age, the form of the drug, and whether the drug is immediate-release or extended-release. Both should be taken only as directed by a medical professional. Oxycodone effectiveness vs. Percocet effectiveness

Both of these medications have been shown to be effective in providing pain relief. There is some evidenceTrusted Source that oxycodone in combination with other analgesics, including acetaminophen, may provide more pain relief and fewer side effects.

Oxycodone immediate-release and Percocet begin working within 15 to 30 minutes of taking them, reach their peak effect within 1 hour, and last for 3 to 6 hours.

Oxycodone extended-release tablets are longer-acting. They start to relieve pain within 2 to 4 hours of taking them, and steadily release the oxycodone for about 12 hours.

Both medications can stop providing effective pain relief when taken long-term. This is called tolerance.

When you begin to develop a tolerance to a drug, you need higher doses to get pain relief. This is normal with long-term opiate use.

How quickly a person develops a tolerance varies. Your body will begin to adapt to the medication in as little as one week of taking regular doses.https://wemedicals.com/product/buy-oxycodone-30mg-online/

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