How long will I take it for?

Depending on why you’re taking oxycodone, you may only need to take it for a short time.

For example, if you’re in pain after an injury or operation, you may only need to take oxycodone for a few days or weeks at most.

You may need to take it for longer if you have a long-term condition such as cancer.

How does oxycodone work?

Oxycodone is from a group of medicines called opiates, or narcotics.

It works in the central nervous system and the brain to block pain signals to the rest of the body. It also reduces the anxiety and stress caused by pain.

Oxycodone

1. About oxycodone

Oxycodone is an opiate painkiller. It’s used to treat severe pain, for example after an operation or a serious injury, or pain from cancer.

It’s also used for other types of long-standing pain when weaker painkillers, such as paracetamolibuprofen and aspirin, have not worked.

Oxycodone is only available on prescription. It comes as slow-release tablets, capsules and a liquid which you swallow. It can also be given by an injection, but this is usually done in hospital.

Oxycodone is also known by the brand names Oxynorm and OxyContin.

It’s sometimes given as a tablet which also has a medicine called naloxone in it (Targinact). This is used to prevent certain side effects, such as constipation.

2. Key facts

  • Oxycodone works by stopping pain signals travelling along the nerves to the brain.
  • Oxycodone liquid and capsules work in 30 to 60 minutes but wear off after 4 to 6 hours.
  • It’s possible to become addicted to oxycodone, but this is rare if you’re taking it to relieve pain and as your doctor has prescribed.
  • Oxycodone can cause withdrawal problems. Do not stop taking the medicine suddenly.
  • The most common side effects of oxycodone are constipation, feeling sick and sleepy.

3. Who can and cannot take oxycodone

Oxycodone can be taken by adults and children aged 1 month and older.

Babies, young children and older people are more likely to get side effects.

Oxycodone is not suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting this medicine if you:

  • have ever had an allergic reaction to oxycodone or any other medicine
  • have lung problems, asthma or breathing difficulties
  • have an addiction to alcohol
  • have a head injury or condition which causes seizures or fits
  • have an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism)
  • have kidney or liver problems
  • have an enlarged prostate
  • have low blood pressure (hypotension)
  • have a mental health condition which is affected by certain medicines
  • have had recent stomach surgery or bowel problems
  • are trying to get pregnant, are already pregnant or if you’re breastfeeding

4. How and when to take it

It’s important to take oxycodone as your doctor has asked you to.

Take oxycodone with, or just after, a meal or snack as it’s less likely to make you feel sick.

It’s important to swallow slow-release oxycodone tablets whole with a drink of water.

Important

Do not break, crush, chew or suck oxycodone slow-release tablets. If you do, the slow-release system will not work and the whole dose might get into your body in one go. This could cause an overdose.

Oxycodone comes as:

  • capsules – these contain 5mg, 10mg or 20mg of oxycodone
  • slow-release tablets – these contain 5mg, 10mg, 15mg, 20mg, 30mg, 40mg, 60mg, 80mg or 120mg of oxycodone
  • liquid – this contains 5mg of oxycodone in 5ml or 10mg of oxycodone in 1ml of liquid.

Oxycodone liquid, capsules and injections work faster (fast acting). They’re used for pain which is expected to last for a short time and often used when you start taking oxycodone, to help find the right dose.

Oxycodone tablets are slow release. This means the oxycodone is gradually released into your body over either 12 or 24 hours. This type of oxycodone takes longer to start working but lasts longer. It’s used for long-term pain.

Sometimes your doctor may prescribe both fast-acting and slow-release oxycodone to manage long-term pain.

How often will I take it?

How often you take it depends on the type of oxycodone that you’ve been prescribed:

  • capsules – usually 4 to 6 times a day
  • slow-release tablets – usually 1 to 2 times a day
  • liquid – usually 4 to 6 times a day

You can take oxycodone at any time of day, but try to take it at the same time every day and space your doses evenly. For example, if you take oxycodone twice a day and have your first dose at 8am, take your second dose at 8pm.

Will my dose go up or down?

Usually, you start on a low dose of oxycodone and this is increased gradually until your pain is well controlled. Once your pain is under control, your doctor may prescribe slow-release tablets. This may cut down the number of doses you have to take each day.

When you stop taking oxycodone your doctor will gradually reduce your dose, especially if you’ve been taking it for a long time.

What if I forget to take it?

This will depend on which type of oxycodone you’re taking.

If you forget to take a dose, check the information that comes with the medicine or ask your pharmacist or doctor for advice.

Never take 2 doses at the same time to make up for a forgotten one.

If you often forget doses, it may help to set an alarm to remind you. You could also ask a pharmacist for advice on other ways to remember to take your medicine.

What if I take too much?

If you go to A&E, do not drive yourself – get someone else to drive you or call for an ambulance.

Take the oxycodone box or leaflet inside the packet plus any remaining medicine with you.

Where to store oxycodone

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  • store it properly and safely at home
  • keep it out of the sight and reach of children
  • do not give your medicine to anyone else
  • return any unused oxycodone to a pharmacy so it can be thrown away safely
  • 5. Taking oxycodone with other painkillers

    It’s safe to take oxycodone with paracetamolibuprofen or aspirin (do not give aspirin to children under 16 years of age).

    Do not take oxycodone with painkillers that contain codeine. You will be more likely to get side effects.

    Painkillers that contain codeine include co-codamol (codeine and paracetamol), Nurofen Plus (codeine and ibuprofen) co-codaprin (codeine and aspirin) and Solpadeine (codeine, paracetamol, ibuprofen and caffeine).

    6. Side effects

    Like all medicines, oxycodone can cause side effects in some people, but many people have no side effects or only minor ones.

    The higher the dose of oxycodone the more chance that you will get side effects.

    Common side effects

    Common side effects happen in more than 1 in 100 people. Talk to a doctor or pharmacist if these side effects bother you or do not go away:

    Serious side effects

    Serious side effects happen in less than 1 in 100 people. Call a doctor if you have:

    • muscle stiffness
    • feel dizzy, tired and have low energy – this could be a sign of low blood pressure (hypotension)
    • Serious allergic reaction

      In rare cases, it’s possible to have a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to oxycodone.https://wemedicals.com/product/buy-oxycodone-30mg-online/

    • 7. How to cope with side effects

      What to do about:

      • constipation – try to include more high-fibre foods in your diet such as fruits, vegetables and cereals. Try to drink several glasses of water each day. If you can, it may also help to do some gentle exercise. Ask your doctor about medicine to help prevent or treat constipation caused by oxycodone.
      • stomach discomfort, feeling or being sick – take oxycodone with or just after a meal or snack to ease feelings of sickness. Ensure the tablets or capsules are swallowed whole with a glass of water. This side effect should usually wear off after a few days. Talk to a doctor about taking anti-sickness medicine if it carries on for longer.
      • feeling sleepy, tired or dizzy – these side effects should wear off within a week or two as your body gets used to oxycodone. Talk to a doctor if they carry on for longer.
      • confusion – talk to a doctor if you feel confused. Your dose may need to be adjusted.
      • headaches – make sure you rest and drink plenty of fluids. It may be best not to drink alcohol while taking oxycodone as this can make headaches worse. It’s safe to take an everyday painkiller such as paracetamol or ibuprofen. Talk to a doctor if headaches last longer than a week or are severe.

      itchiness or rash – it may help to take an antihistamine which you can buy from a pharmacy. Check with the pharmacist to see what type is suitable for you. If symptoms do not go away or they get worse, talk to a doctor as you may need to try a different painkiller.

      Do not take any other medicines to treat the side effects of oxycodone without speaking to a pharmacist or doctor first.

      8. Pregnancy and breastfeeding

      Oxycodone is generally not recommended during pregnancy or while breastfeeding.

      In early pregnancy, it’s been linked to some problems for your baby. If you take oxycodone at the end of pregnancy there’s a risk that your baby may get withdrawal symptoms or be addicted to oxycodone when they’re born.

      However, it’s important to treat pain in pregnancy. For some pregnant women with severe pain, oxycodone might be the right medicine. Your doctor is the best person to help you decide what’s right for you and your baby.

      Find out more about how oxycodone can affect you and your baby during pregnancy) from Best Use of Medicines in Pregnancy (BUMPS).

      Oxycodone and breastfeeding

      Oxycodone is not usually recommended if you’re breastfeeding. Small amounts of oxycodone pass into breast milk and may cause breathing problems for your baby.

      Tell a doctor if you are breastfeeding. They may be able to recommend a different painkiller.

      9. Cautions with other medicines

      Some medicines and oxycodone interfere with each other and increase the chance that you will have side effects.

      Tell a doctor before you start taking oxycodone if you are taking any medicines:

      • to help you sleep
      • for depression or mental health problems – some types cannot be taken with oxycodone
      • for high blood pressure (hypertension)
      • to help stop you feeling or being sick (vomiting), such as domperidone or metoclopramide
      • to treat symptoms of an allergy such as antihistamines
      • to reduce tension or anxiety
      • for an infection
      • to control seizures of fits due to epilepsy

      Mixing oxycodone with herbal remedies and supplements

      It’s not possible to say that oxycodone is safe to take with herbal remedies and supplements. They’re not tested for the effect they have on other medicines in the same way pharmacy and prescription medicines are.

      Important

      Tell a doctor or pharmacist if you’re taking any other medicines, including herbal remedies, vitamins or supplements.

How long does it take for oxycodone to work?

Fast-acting oxycodone (capsules and liquid) take 30 to 60 minutes to work, but these wear off after 4 to 6 hours. Slow-acting oxycodone (tablets) can take 1 to 2 days to work fully, but the pain relief will last longer.

This depends on the type of oxycodone you take – fast acting or slow acting.

Fast-acting oxycodone (capsules and liquid) take 30 to 60 minutes to work, but these wear off after 4 to 6 hours.

Slow-acting oxycodone (tablets) can take 1 to 2 days to work fully, but the pain relief will last longer.

An oxycodone injection into a vein gives the quickest pain relief and works almost straight away.

Is oxycodone the same as Percocet?

Oxycodone and Percocet are often confused for the same medication. This is understandable as both are opioid pain medications and both have been in the news a lot due to the opioid epidemic.

Percocet is a brand name for a drug that contains a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen — another pain medication more commonly known by its brand name, Tylenol.

Any drug that contains oxycodone, including Percocet, has a potential for abuse. Both oxycodone and Percocet are considered highly addictive. The key differences between them are:

  • Oxycodone is a derivative of opium and sold under different brand names, including OxyContin.
  • Percocet is a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen.
  • Oxycodone and Percocet are both classified as narcotic analgesics.
What is oxycodone and what is Percocet?

Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opiate that is made by modifying thebaine, an organic compound in opium.

Oxycodone is available in different forms. This includes:

  • immediate-release tablets and capsules (Oxaydo, Roxicodone, Roxybond), which are released into the bloodstream right away
  • extended-release tablets and capsules (OxyContin), which are released into the bloodstream gradually
  • oral solution, which is used for managing pain in people who cannot swallow tablets, and is often administered via a gastric tube

Oxycodone acts on your central nervous system (CNS) to block the feeling of pain. Percocet does this as well, but offers a second mode of pain relief from the acetaminophen, which is a non-opiate analgesic that also relieves fever.

Oxycodone  uses vs. Percocet uses

Oxycodone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form provides relief of ongoing pain, such as pain associated with cancer.

Percocet is also used to treat moderate to severe pain, but can also be prescribed for conditions associated with fever. It can also be used to treat breakthrough pain when a long-acting pain drug doesn’t provide enough relief.

Percocet is not recommended for long-term use because acetaminophen has been found to cause serious liver damage.

Dosing depends on your need and age, the form of the drug, and whether the drug is immediate-release or extended-release. Both should be taken only as directed by a medical professional. Oxycodone effectiveness vs. Percocet effectiveness

Both of these medications have been shown to be effective in providing pain relief. There is some evidenceTrusted Source that oxycodone in combination with other analgesics, including acetaminophen, may provide more pain relief and fewer side effects.

Oxycodone immediate-release and Percocet begin working within 15 to 30 minutes of taking them, reach their peak effect within 1 hour, and last for 3 to 6 hours.

Oxycodone extended-release tablets are longer-acting. They start to relieve pain within 2 to 4 hours of taking them, and steadily release the oxycodone for about 12 hours.

Both medications can stop providing effective pain relief when taken long-term. This is called tolerance.

When you begin to develop a tolerance to a drug, you need higher doses to get pain relief. This is normal with long-term opiate use.

How quickly a person develops a tolerance varies. Your body will begin to adapt to the medication in as little as one week of taking regular doses.https://wemedicals.com/product/buy-oxycodone-30mg-online/

How much is a oxycodone 30 mg?

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Can a prescription for Xanax be called in?

It is part of a group of prescription drugs called benzodiazepines. Xanax is also a controlled drug, which means it has the potential to cause dependence or to be misused. These medications are regulated by law and it is illegal to take Xanax without a prescription from a medical doctor.

Is Xanax a sedative?

Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax and Valium, are sedatives in the form of a mild tranquilizer that work by slowing down the brain and central nervous system. They can help relax the body and reduce anxiety, but guidelines advise against extended use of the drugs, especially among the older population.

Xanax and Other Sedatives Can Be Addictive for Older Adults

Researchers say older adults can become dependent on medications for anxiety. Alternative treatments should be considered.

They can be prescribed as a temporary means of easing depression, improving sleep, and lowering anxiety.

However, new researchTrusted Source has found that prescribing benzodiazepines may cause addiction issues in 1 in 4 older adults.

Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax and Valium, are sedatives in the form of a mild tranquilizer that work by slowing down the brain and central nervous system.

They can help relax the body and reduce anxiety, but guidelines advise against extended use of the drugs, especially among the older population.

“Use of benzodiazepines by older adults have been associated with a host of potential risks including falls, fractures, motor vehicle accidents, and potentially, an increased risk of dementia. Additionally, when these types of medications are combined with other prescribed medications, such as opioids, they can increase the risk of unintentional overdoses and death,” Dr. Lauren Gerlach, a geriatric psychiatrist at the University of Michigan and lead author of the research, told Healthline.

What researchers discovered

Gerlach and her colleagues examined the use of benzodiazepines in older, low-income adults.

The researchers interviewed patients who weren’t living in nursing homes or skilled nursing facilities. They also screened them for mental health issues, as well as gathered data on their prescription history.

Out of the 576 patients studied who were given their first prescription for benzodiazepine between 2008 and 2016, 152 of those patients still had a prescription a year later.

Although guidelines state benzodiazepines should rarely be prescribed to adults over the age of 65, the average age of those receiving their first benzodiazepine prescription was 78.

Only a few of the patients had received any psychiatric or psychological care in the previous two years. All had been prescribed the medications by a nonpsychiatrist, such as a primary care physician.

“The vast majority of mental healthcare, and prescribing of psychiatric medications such as benzodiazepines to older adults, is by primary care physicians and other nonpsychiatrists. Since mental health providers see only a very small minority of older adults who have mental health issues, we need to support primary care providers better as they manage these patients’ care,” Gerlach said.

Patients who were white were four times as likely to continue with long-term use of the drugs.

The initial amount prescribed also made a difference.

“We found that nonclinical factors such as patient race and the days’ supply in the initial prescription were strongly associated with conversion to long-term use. For just every 10 additional days of medication prescribed, a patient’s risk of long-term use nearly doubled over the next year,” Gerlach said.

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Sleep can be a problem

Poor sleep was one of the factors associated with continued use of the medications.

This is despite the fact that guidelines suggest against using such drugs as long-term sleep aids.

It’s believed benzodiazepines might actually worsen rather than improve sleep with long-term use.

Dr. Grace Cheng is a geriatric pharmacist at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA).

She says that patients can become dependent on sedatives after seeing a quick improvement of their symptoms.

“Benzodiazepines can be a rapid solution for debilitating symptoms, such as the inability to fall asleep and resolution of an acute panic attack, which leads to patients’ satisfaction and perceived benefits of therapy. This may result in dependence and longer duration of use. However, they do not address the chronic management of insomnia, anxiety, and depression,” Cheng told Healthline

Cheng says there are occasions where prescribing benzodiazepines may be appropriate, but as many older adults are prescribed these drugs to deal with anxiety, insomnia, or panic disorders, there are other treatment options that should be considered.

“There are more evidence-based pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions that need to be explored prior to the use of benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines should be reserved for when other treatments are not available or effective, but just as importantly, the discussion regarding the safety of these medications should occur prior to prescribing them,” she said.

Dr. Peter Pompei is a geriatrician at Stanford University.

He says physicians should be making more of an effort to adhere to guidelines on benzodiazepines.

“Physicians want to meet their patients’ needs, and too often ignore the guidelines. More awareness of the hazards of these drugs is important for physicians caring for older persons,” he told Healthline.

Gerlach says that although the prescription of sedatives may start out well-intentioned, long-term use can be difficult to address due to patient dependence.

Both patients and providers may then be hesitant to discontinue treatment as they feel alternatives won’t be as effective.

She says physicians should have a long-term plan in mind when prescribing a benzodiazepine, paying particular attention to the amount prescribed.

“We need to help providers start with the end in mind when prescribing a benzodiazepine, by beginning with a short-duration prescription and engaging patients in discussions of when to reevaluate their symptoms and begin tapering the patient off. Since chronic benzodiazepine use is rarely the goal when a new benzodiazepine is started, clinicians may decrease the likelihood of long-term use by limiting the amount of medication they provide in that initial prescription,” Gerlach said.

As well as this, improving education for other non-pharmacological treatment, such as cognitive behavior therapy, will enable physicians to feel they can provide their patients with alternatives to sedatives.

If benzodiazepines are prescribed, Cheng says it is essential physicians continue to check in with their patients to minimize risk of long-term use.

“It is important that there is adequate communication and close follow-up with patients taking these medications. If the benzodiazepine is being prescribed for more short-term reasons, healthcare providers should include, as part of the discussion, the expected duration of therapy,” she said.

“If the benzodiazepine is being used for anxiety and panic disorder management, the role of benzodiazepines should be reserved for acute management of anxiety and panic symptoms on an as-needed basis. Healthcare providers should discuss options for the chronic management of anxiety and panic disorders during the same visit, as well as set up routine follow-up to evaluate for the efficacy, adherence, and safety of the medications,” she added.

 

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Xanax and Other Sedatives Can Be Addictive for Older Adults

Researchers say older adults can become dependent on medications for anxiety. Alternative treatments should be considered.

They can be prescribed as a temporary means of easing depression, improving sleep, and lowering anxiety.

However, new researchTrusted Source has found that prescribing benzodiazepines may cause addiction issues in 1 in 4 older adults.

Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax and Valium, are sedatives in the form of a mild tranquilizer that work by slowing down the brain and central nervous system.

They can help relax the body and reduce anxiety, but guidelines advise against extended use of the drugs, especially among the older population.

“Use of benzodiazepines by older adults have been associated with a host of potential risks including falls, fractures, motor vehicle accidents, and potentially, an increased risk of dementia. Additionally, when these types of medications are combined with other prescribed medications, such as opioids, they can increase the risk of unintentional overdoses and death,” Dr. Lauren Gerlach, a geriatric psychiatrist at the University of Michigan and lead author of the research, told Healthline.

What researchers discovered

Gerlach and her colleagues examined the use of benzodiazepines in older, low-income adults.

The researchers interviewed patients who weren’t living in nursing homes or skilled nursing facilities. They also screened them for mental health issues, as well as gathered data on their prescription history.

Out of the 576 patients studied who were given their first prescription for benzodiazepine between 2008 and 2016, 152 of those patients still had a prescription a year later.

Although guidelines state benzodiazepines should rarely be prescribed to adults over the age of 65, the average age of those receiving their first benzodiazepine prescription was 78.

Only a few of the patients had received any psychiatric or psychological care in the previous two years. All had been prescribed the medications by a nonpsychiatrist, such as a primary care physician.

“The vast majority of mental healthcare, and prescribing of psychiatric medications such as benzodiazepines to older adults, is by primary care physicians and other nonpsychiatrists. Since mental health providers see only a very small minority of older adults who have mental health issues, we need to support primary care providers better as they manage these patients’ care,” Gerlach said.

Patients who were white were four times as likely to continue with long-term use of the drugs.

The initial amount prescribed also made a difference.

“We found that nonclinical factors such as patient race and the days’ supply in the initial prescription were strongly associated with conversion to long-term use. For just every 10 additional days of medication prescribed, a patient’s risk of long-term use nearly doubled over the next year,” Gerlach said.

Is Xanax bad for your liver?

Is xanax bad for your liver? Prolonged use of Xanax has the risk of potentially damaging the nerve tissue of the liver. When this happens, liver inflammation may occur. Even if you are not familiar with the different brand names of prescription drugs, you may have heard of Xanax. When used responsibly, Xanax can provide a range of benefits. Is xanax harmful to your liver? However, when misused or abused, this drug can cause some undesirable side effects. Could liver damage be one of them?

What Is Xanax?

Xanax is the brand name of Alprazolam, which is a sedative in prescription benzodiazepines. It is designed to relieve and treat anxiety and panic disorder. This is how it works:
  1. Xanax targets and enhances the chemical in your brain that’s responsible for relaxation.
  2. It depresses the central nervous system to decrease activity and ease restlessness.
Is xanax bad for your liver? Xanax is known for calming users down and providing quick relief, which is why it is commonly abused. However, Xanax can be successful for individuals with diagnosed anxiety disorders who have talked to their doctor about what they are experiencing. If you or someone you know has an anxiety or panic disorder, ask your doctor how Xanax may affect you.

The Effects of Xanax, is xanax bad for your liver?

Even though Xanax has a different impact on everyone, there are some common and potentially dangerous side effects to be aware of. Xanax, when used for a prolonged period of time, may cause or contribute to:
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Dry mouth
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Trouble with balance
  • Speech issues
  • Decreased inhibitions
  • Irritable behavior
  • Weight changes
  • Appetite changes
  • Skin rash
  • Trouble breathing
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Blurred vision
  • Yellow skin or eyes
  • Trouble breathing
  • Hallucinations
  • Mania or increased energy
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Suicidal thoughts
While there are many possibilities regarding the issues that Xanax may create in a person’s body and mind, one question still remains: can it cause liver damage?

Can Xanax Cause Liver Damage?

Is xanax bad for your liver? Using Xanax for an extended period of time comes with a risk of potentially damaging nerve tissue in the liver. When this happens, liver inflammation may occur. Is xanax bad for your liver? This depends on the condition of someone’s liver, how long they’ve used substances for, and how frequently they use them. These risks are intensified if a person combines Xanax with alcohol. Alcohol abuse is one of the leading causes of liver inflammation and damage. When someone combines alcohol with another substance, especially one that can also cause liver problems, their personal risk will only increase.

How to Protect Your Liver

Is xanax bad for your liver? The most effective way to protect your liver is to abstain from alcohol and drugs. However, it’s sometimes necessary to take specific prescription drugs. If you have a history of alcohol abuse or liver damage in your family, talk to your doctor before using any prescriptions such as Xanax. If you’re prescribed Xanax, only use according to prescription. Do not take more pills than the recommended highly dosage. For further liver relief and general wellness, try to drink plenty of water and eat a balanced diet daily.

Dangers Of Xanax Addiction

Xanax works by increasing the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. The more that Xanax is used, the less the brain regulates this chemical on its own. This causes fluctuating rates of GABA, which is why seizures may occur from either abusing Xanax or abruptly stopping Xanax use. When a person stops taking Xanax, the brain has to readjust to producing GABA naturally. This can mean a period of time in which brain activity is increased and anxiety is higher because the brain is no longer as efficient at self-regulating. This is what leads people to develop a Xanax addiction.

If you think that you or a loved one may be experiencing negative side effects from Xanax, contact our team of substance abuse and medical professionals to see if treatment or other medication options might be best for you. Visit us here or call 866-345-1543 to learn more.

Sources

https://vertavahealth.com/alprazolam/side-effects/ https://americanaddictioncenters.org/xanax-treatment/long-term-severe

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How to use alprazolam oral

How to use alprazolam oral

How to use alprazolam oral? Read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start taking alprazolam and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

how to take alprazolam for sleep

Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually once daily in the morning. Do not take with a high-fat meal because doing so can increase the risk of side effects. Do not crush or chew extended-release tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects.

Also, do not split the tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing. Dosage is based on your medical condition, age, and response to treatment. Your dose may be gradually increased until the drug starts working well. Follow your doctor’s instructions closely to reduce the risk of side effects.

How to use alprazolam oral

Though it helps many people, this medication may sometimes cause addiction. This risk may be higher if you have a substance use disorder (such as overuse of or addiction to drugs/alcohol). Take this medication exactly as prescribed to lower the risk of addiction. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more detail. When this medication is used for a long time, it may not work as well. Talk with your doctor if this medication stops working well.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

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